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2018 shortlist

celebrating the works of australian women authors

 
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australian author longlisted for 2018!

 
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THE ENLIGHTENMENT OF THE GREENGAGE TREE – SHOKOOFEH AZAR

An extraordinarily powerful and evocative literary novel set in Iran in the period immediately after the Islamic Revolution in 1979. Using the lyrical magic realism style of classical Persian storytelling, Azar draws the reader deep into the heart of a family caught in the maelstrom of post-revolutionary chaos and brutality that sweeps across an ancient land and its people.

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THE LIFE TO COME – MICHELLE DE KRETSER

Set in Sydney, Paris and Sri Lanka, The Life to Come is a mesmerising novel about the stories we tell and don't tell ourselves as individuals, as societies and as nations. Profoundly moving and wickedly funny, it reveals how the shadows cast by both the past and the future can transform, distort and undo the present.

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SEE WHAT I HAVE DONE – SARAH SCHMIDT

A deeply atmospheric novel by a startling new Aussie talent; an incredibly unique look inside the mind of Lizzie Borden, famously accused of murdering her father and stepmother in 1892.

LINCOLN IN THE BARDO – GEORGE SAUNDERS

Deploying a theatrical, kaleidoscopic panoply of voices – living and dead, historical and fictional –poses a timeless question: how do we live and love when we know that everything we hold dear must end?

WINNER!

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TRACKER – ALEXIS WRIGHT

A collective memoir of the charismatic Aboriginal leader, political thinker and entrepreneur Tracker Tilmouth, who died in Darwin in 2015 at the age of 62. Having known him for many years, Alexis Wright interviewed Tracker, along with family, friends, colleagues, and the politicians he influenced, weaving his and their stories together.

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TERRA NULLIUS – CLAIRE G. COLEMAN

The Natives of the Colony are restless. The Settlers are eager to have a nation of peace, and to bring the savages into line. Families are torn apart, reeducation is enforced. This rich land will provide for all. This is not Australia as we know it. This is not the Australia of our history. 
This is an incredible debut from a striking new Australian Aboriginal voice.

 
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THE FISH GIRL – MIRANDI RIWOE

Sparked by the description of a ‘Malay trollope’ in W. Somerset Maugham’s story, The Four Dutchmen, Mirandi Riwoe’s novella, The Fish Girl tells of an Indonesian girl whose life is changed irrevocably when she moves from a small fishing village to work in the house of a Dutch merchant. There she finds both hardship and tenderness as her traditional past and colonial present collide.

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AN UNCERTAIN GRACE – KRISSY KNEEN

Some time in the near future, university lecturer Caspar receives a gift from a former student called Liv: a memory stick containing a virtual narrative. Hooked up to a virtual reality bodysuit, he becomes immersed in the experience of their past relationship. Moving and thoughtful, it is about who we are - our best and worst selves, our innermost selves and who we might become.

 
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EXTINCTIONS – JOSEPHINE WILSON

Humorous, poignant and galvanising by turns, Extinctions is a novel about all kinds of extinction – natural, racial, national and personal – and what we can do to prevent them.

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2017 WINNERS

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INTO THE HEART OF TASMANIA – REBE TAYLOR

One man’s ambition to rewrite the history of human culture inspires an exploration of the controversy stirred by Tasmanian Aboriginal history.

WINNER OF THE TASMANIA BOOK PRIZE

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THE MUSEUM OF MODERN LOVE – HEATHER ROSE

A mesmerising literary novel about a lost man in search of connection - a meditation on love, art and commitment, set against the backdrop of one of the greatest art events in modern history.

WINNER OF THE MARGARET SCOTT PRIZE

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LOSING STREAK – JAMES BOYCE

A jaw-dropping account of how one company came to own every poker machine in the state of Tasmania – and the cost to democracy, the public purse and problem gamblers and their families.

PEOPLE'S CHOICE WINNER